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Happy New Year! New Year is a time for new beginnings, but also a time for celebrating the best moments of the previous year.  2013 was a great year for The NextWomen and we couldn’t have done it without you, our community. So, to mark the occasion, we’re announcing the top ten most popular The NextWomen articles of 2013, judged by the amount of times they have been read by you!

We’re really looking forward to what 2014 has in store, and we’ve got some inspirational articles and high profile interviews lined up for you over the coming months.

 

We are so excited about the relaunch of our Business Advice Programme and all the amazing NextAdvisors we have lined up, ready to give you the expertise you need to make your business fly! Amongst them is Polly Gowers, CEO and Founder of Everyclick and one of the best connected women in British business! 

To celebrate and showcase the wonderful high profile entrepreneurs, investors and experts who have signed up to provide advice to our community, we'll be publishing articles and interiews with them from the archives.

Here is our interview with Polly Gowers from 2011.

For more details on The Business Advice Programme and to sign up, click here. 

Polly Gowers is CEO and Founder of Everyclick, which has recently launched its Give As You Live service. Give as you Live lets internet users raise funds for their chosen charities for free as they shop online. With every purchase a consumer makes from 1,300 leading retailers, a donation is made to any of the UK’s 220,000 charities, as chosen by the shopper.

To date, over £2m has been disbursed to a wide range of charities through Everyclick’s technology platform.

Polly has been shortlisted for Director magazine’s Best Connected Women in British Business competition, alongside names such as Martha Lane Fox and Sarah Browne.

This is what Polly had to say when we interviewed her:

 

Wall StreetKnown as The First Woman of Finance, Muriel Siebert was the first woman to own a seat on the New York Stock Exchange and the first woman to head one of the NYSE's member firms. She joined the 1,365 male members of the exchange on . Alisa Roost looks at her legacy.

Just over two weeks ago, Muriel Siebert died. In 1993, I worked as a temporary employee for her company, Siebert Financial Corporation. The culture of that company differed from any other place I temped; she created a nurturing firm and I learned an invaluable lesson: women need to negotiate on their own behalf.

Rania Anderson looks at the recent global study completed by Dell and The Global Entrepreneurship Development Institute (GEDI), which measured and ranked conditions for high-potential female entrepreneurs in 17 countries.

If you look at the data, you will see that the progress of women in business leadership has stalled.

It seems counterintuitive when globally, education, employment and entrepreneurship rates for women are rising. All over the world governments, organizations, businesses and individuals strive to capitalize on the rise of highly educated women. They seek to find the winning formula that will increase women entrepreneurship and drive economic prosperity. There are more programs than ever before to help accelerate women in business and women are getting mentors and sponsors, training and resources.

The NextWomen Generations & Family Business Theme.

Bev James looks at the attributes of Gen Y and what they will bring to the table as leaders of tomorrow.

Move over baby-boomers, there are new kids on the block!

Here comes Generation Y, the Facebook generation, who are changing the face of business forever.

New research tells us that there is a continuous increase in the number of graduates describing themselves as self-employed or freelance, with more and more young people wanting to be their own boss.

It’s a trend that is happening all over the world.

Griselda Kumordzie Togobo reviews Sue Stockdale's new book about business and growth strategies, The Growth Story: Successful Business Growth Strategies used by Women Entrepreneurs.

It’s the aspiration of many female entrepreneurs to build successful businesses. How you plan to achieve such growth is one of the challenges that most small business grapple with.

Sue Stockdale’s The Growth Story charts the journeys of women entrepreneurs and the strategies they adapted to turn their ideas into multi-million businesses.  

Sue Stockdale is an inspirational speaker and coach and the first British woman to ski to the North Pole, having represented Scotland in track and field athletics. She is also currently the London Chapter Chair of Women Presidents Organisation. 

Sue gives some sound advice that resonated with me such as:

 “Growing organically made us a lean company and gave us the opportunity to become experts in all growth stages.

"We did all the work in-house and this allowed us to save money and have the cash available for growth” Brenda VanDuinkerken

Guest post from John Gerzema, whose new book, The Athena Doctrine, examines the rise of feminine traits and values. Part of The Next Women Career Theme.

For centuries, workplaces have been dominated by masculine codes of conduct: Be tough. Buck up. Don’t cry. Those codes are still entrenched today, of course, but their grip on corporate culture is loosening—and feminine values are gaining an ever-stronger foothold. 

Traits like candor, flexibility, patience and vulnerability have emerged as remarkable assets in today’s rising leaders—and, as a result, have trickled down into company culture, reshaping dynamics in both the workplace and society at large.  

In the Athena Doctrine, a book I co-authored with Michael D’Antonio, we examined the changing role of gender traits across the globe. We surveyed 64,000 people in 13 coun­tries across a wide swath of cultural, political and economic diversity. We gathered data from Canada to Chile and Mexico to Indonesia. 

Some of the Top Ten Female UK Part Time Execs Guest post from Karen Mattison, Founder of Timewise Jobs, a jobsite for professional level part time jobs, who we featured in this interview earlier in the month. Part of our Career Theme.

In the course of launching Timewise Jobs, I began receiving calls and emails amazing ‘hidden’ part timers out there – heads of marketing, finance directors, managing directors; people who had quietly been working less than five full days a week for years, and were hitting all their targets, growing businesses and designing the next big thing.

I conducted research and discovered these brilliant people were just the tip of the iceberg.

Travel-minded entrepreneurs with location free businesses are in the perfect position to contribute their skills and experience to developing countries.

Location free skills

Location free or location independent businesses aren’t tied to an office or physical location, which means the people running them can do so from almost anywhere in the world.

The fact that they tend to be web-based companies - providing anything from information services to software applications or communicating and working with clients remotely – also helps; location free businesses are well placed to help support the growing need and development of ICT within developing countries.

When it comes to making an enterprise really WORK there are a million things that need to be done. Juggling and prioritising are the order of the day and most of us live in the hope that someday the laws of time will change and all of a sudden we find ourselves with another ten hours a week, gratis.

Well, what if I told you that by making some simple shifts in how you work you could create those ten extra hours?

And it doesn’t mean spending time implementing new complicated workflow systems. It doesn’t mean taking on another six staff members. All it means is that you still prioritise, and you end up doing more of the stuff you love to get done?

Sound interesting? – well keep reading, because whether it’s the networking, or the writing, or the reporting or the managing of staff you love, there is a way that you can rock your revenue, whilst juggling everything else in your life and business, and still have fun doing it.