Industry NewsSyndicate content

Winners and finalists of the 2014 Women in Logistics AwardsOn the 18th June, The Next Women reported on the shortlist for the Women in Logistics Awards 2014. Read more here. Well, a few weeks on and we now have great pleasure in being able to follow up on the winners.

Stephanie J. HaleMaila Reeves reviews Celebrity Authors' Secrets, a new book by Stephanie J. Hale.

Stephanie J. Hale gives us a fascinating view into the practice and process of some of the worlds’ most popular and prolific authors, in a series of insightful interview transcripts.

What is perhaps most interesting about this collection is that whilst the authors are very different and encompass a broad range of genres and writing styles, there are definite under-pinning themes which radiate out from the literary world. 

Women In Logistics Awards 2013 - Company of the YearThe nine individuals and two companies in the running for awards at the Women in Logistics annual conference and awards have been unveiled.

The most popular across four categories will be honoured at a glittering ceremony in Warwickshire on the evening of Friday June 27, in the company of the judges Professor Richard Wilding and Ruth Waring, and special guest Mrs Beverley Bell, the UK's first female traffic commissioner.

Leesa Muirhead, Founder, Adessy AssociatesWomen are powerful catalysts as world changers and tend to have a close relationship with their local communities and a sense of connection with the wider world. Women’s influence is expanding and as more women develop businesses, products and services, many have a deep desire to contribute to making a difference and creating sustainable, positive change.

Supporting the central role women play in influencing and shaping society, a new fellowship focused on elevating the social impact of influential women (and men) is launching this November.

Pioneers for Change actively seeks to gather a community of international wealth holders and inheritors, entrepreneurs, investors, senior executives, career changers and talented thinkers and do-ers.

Nikki Yates; GSK; young women; STEM; telling stories; Apprentice Trailblazers

Nikki Yates, former nurse and now General Manager of GSK’s UK business, explains to The NextWomen why showcasing creativity and collaboration is the key to attracting ambitious young women into science and engineering – and how everyone in the industry can help by sharing their own inspiring stories.

Georgina-Kate Adams, Founder of The Seed, Africa,with a girl whose education was funded through the project. Megan Foo of The NextWomen examines the issue of the lack of access to education for girls in developing countries. Megan talks to Georgina-Kate Adams, Founder of crowdfunding project The Seed, Africa, regarding the impact of educating girls through crowdfunding.

Lana Larder of The NextWomen considers the importance of identifying and protecting your company’s most valuable assets, discussing the issue with Mary Juetten, founder of Traklight, a software product which helps business owners protect their ideas.

Charles Hylton-Potts explains the basics of EU data protection law. In a series of articles, Charles Hylton-Potts, a lawyer based in London, covers a range of legal topics relevant to establishing a business in the EU. Click here to check out his previous article.

More innovative financing options, such as crowdfunding, are now available to entrepreneurs worldwide. A new breed of entrepreneurs is emerging.

Akosua Dardaine Edwards, founder of the Enabling Enterprise Project, examines some of the recent trends within entrepreneurship, considering the rise in female entrepreneurs, the increasing and more innovative financing methods available, and the rise of social entrepreneurship.

Over the last decade, entrepreneurship has come to the fore, not simply as a means of job creation and reviving the economy, but also as a means of introducing new ways of thinking and problem solving. Some experts have also suggested that entrepreneurship ought to be a way of life.

Alexandra Anghel offers advice on when it's the right decision to say no to an investor.

We have all heard the horror stories about how difficult it is to raise money, especially in Europe.

Investors are used to saying no a lot and most of the time they have a valid reason for doing so. Not the right market, not the right product, not the right team.  

So what do you do when you (finally!) get one of them to say yes? Do you analyze if they are the right match for your startup or if you have good chemistry? And when you get your hands on one of those coveted term sheets and it’s not exactly what you expected, do you consider saying NO to them?