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Georgina-Kate Adams, Founder of The Seed, Africa,with a girl whose education was funded through the project. Megan Foo of The NextWomen examines the issue of the lack of access to education for girls in developing countries. Megan talks to Georgina-Kate Adams, Founder of crowdfunding project The Seed, Africa, regarding the impact of educating girls through crowdfunding.

Megan Foo, a Year 12 student in Hong Kong, shares her thoughts on the challenges posed by gender gaps in STEM industriesMegan Foo, student, and the President of the Hong Kong Chapter of Women LEAD, talks to The NextWomen about the disconcerting underrepresentation of women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields, considering why women are being deterred from studying STEM subjects, and how this issue can be overcome. 

Monday morning,  I joined the first day of the inaugural Astia Global Entrepreneur Program’s 2012 Summer Cohort, held on June 25-29, 2012 in New York City.
Astia is a global non-profit accelerator with a mission to propel women-led high-growth ventures, and Astia’s tag line, “Where Women Innovators Succeed,” says it all.
Twelve exceptional women-led ventures, carefully selected by the Astia community, will attend this weeklong intensive boot camp. After the Summer Cohort, the startups will be mentored for three months. I am here as observer - I am a serial entrepreneur and doing my MBA and intern at Golden Seeds, an angel network that scouts and invests in women-led companies.

A recent release from the GMAT people showed two interesting trends for Chinese women – first, they are going to grad schools at a far higher percentage than women in other countries and at a much younger age, 25; and second that most are heading to Western universities. For most of the women quoted, they see foreign universities offering better educational experiences, especially for those wanting to work in foreign countries. India, Canada, the UK and Singapore are the top b-school destinations, according to GMAC.

If you want to be an entrepreneur, do you have to go to college?

In our story titled Stay in or drop out? The entrepreneur’s education fiasco, TNW Editor Brad McCarty states that the average public university (in the US) will set you back nearly $80,000 for a 4-year program. And a private school will cost in excess of $150,000.

“At the end of that time, you have a bellybutton,” he writes. “Oh sure, you might have a piece of paper that says you have a Bachelor of Science or Art degree but what you actually have is something that has become so ubiquitous that it’s really not worth much more than the lint inside your own navel.”

In New York City, two entrepreneurs aim to disrupt the traditional university form with a new education incubation model that’s reminiscent of old school apprenticeships. E[nstitute], which launched last week, features the city’s most notable entrepreneurs who will act as mentors to a class of aspiring young fellows.

It’s common knowledge that Google is one of the most desired employers in the world. Yet, a startup project made the Brazilian MIT student Isabel Pesce Mattos drop out of both Google and MIT. And it seems it wasn’t such a bad idea. The startup she joined is called Lemon, and reportedly raised no less than $10 million in funding thanks to its receipt tracking app (see our review).

It’s not a story about luck or privilege; Isabel Pesce’s trajectory is a shining example of determination against all odds.

Unlike many of her fellow students, Isabel wasn’t raised to join a top American university. She only found out about MIT’s program for foreigners two weeks before the deadline, she remembers, laughing.

The NextWomen is delighted to announce a partnership with Udemy, the exciting new platform whose goal is to disrupt and democratize the world of education by enabling anyone to teach and learn online.

We are very excited to offer our readers discounted rates on a selection of Udemy’s best and most relevant training courses.

In this week’s discounted course “Raising Capital for Startups” you will learn the following from top founders and investors such as Dave McClure, Founder 500 Startups, the most prolific angel investment firm of 2010:

The Win Win Win team receive special recognition for their social enterprise projectAre you sitting on a future business idea, and not sure how best to take it forward? Are you short of either time or the experience and knowledge to do the initial phase of planning by yourself?

If so, why not submit your idea for inclusion in the Innovation, Entrepreneurship & Design (IE&D) Projects module at Imperial College Business School. Now in its fourth year, this programme accepts good ideas from external inventors and entrepreneurs as well from Imperial’s own students. The call for proposals is open until 11th November.

This is a Guest post by NextWomen Partners at TopMBA.com - Ross Geraghty and Richard Burns.

Have you ever questioned how useful an MBA could be for entrepreneurs? Although the programme has usually been perceived as a good investment for corporate careers, the motivations seem to be changing and various founders are turning to these programmes to accelerate their skills growth, whether it is through a 2 year in sito degree or an online MBA degree.