Business LifeSyndicate content

YouNoodle.ComStartup Noise

It is a well-known fact that startup competitions are growing at a high rate globally. From incubators and accelerators to corporations fostering their own competitions, the hunt for disruptive technological ideas seems to be endless. In a world of startup noise, how are interested parties finding prototypes of what really matters? Adriana Galue investigates.

Misty W. Gibbs explores whether you need to fail or whether you just need a first draft...

Fail fast and fail hard. Fail early and fail often. This message is drummed into aspiring entrepreneurs, almost like a badge of honor. The essence of the idea makes sense; you need to make mistakes to learn. And mistakes are unavoidable – you WILL make them. I have yet to meet an entrepreneur or businessperson who doesn’t have an answer to: ‘If I knew then what I know now…’

The executive board must know 100% why the NED is there and what the NED plans to contributeStephen Archer, Founder of Spring Partnerships, discusses what NEDs should do in the first 100 days to ensure success.  

With the increased focus on the role and accountability of Non-Executive Directors it seems to me that their whole mindset needs to change along with the expectations of other board members expectations.

In my experience the NED is still seen as an outsider and NED’s also view themselves as outsiders.

Whilst their degree of detachment from the day to day life of a business can be a healthy thing, the detachment caused by episodic intervention can be very unhealthy and greatly restricts the ability of the NED to deliver value and exercise their governance duties.

The first 100 days is something of a cliché for executives, but for NED's it is assumed that they just step straight in with their ‘experience’; listen in and contribute when they see fit. 

Andy Whittaker and Andy CopeBe Brilliant Everyday is a down to earth, somewhat irreverent, practical collection of distilled pearls of wisdom collected from the relentlessly expanding sphere of self-help.

The advice is human and realistic and is very much a departure from the often touted, “all your problems solved route to health, wealth and happiness" material so prevalent in this genre.

Natalie Panek, robotic operator and aerospace engineer at MDA Space Missions, shares with The NextWomen the importance of furthering cross-disciplinary collaborations in technology industries, underscoring the role of collaboration as a catalyst for innovation in tech.

Innovation inherently requires collaboration; whether through personal relationships, collaborating with a team to solve a problem, or learning from others in order to create change. Collaboration is often most effective with an appreciation for interdisciplinary work environments.

The newly released Dell-sponsored Gender-Global Entrepreneurship and Development Index (GEDI) revealed that more than 75% of the 30 countries surveyed are not providing the most fundamental conditions required for female entrepreneurs to prosper. Even more troubling, emerging economies are much further behind than advanced economies in creating the conditions that enable businesses founded by women to thrive. 

The report correctly directs policy makers and institutions to work on improving conditions for female entrepreneurs on several fronts, simultaneously. In the interim, what actions can you personally take to enable your own business success?


Megan Foo talks to The NextWomen about the importance of female entrepreneurs in business and how encouraging more women to pursue careers as entrepreneurs can have many positive results, such as greater diversity in business and increased empowerment for women across the globe.

Identifying your strengths can help you to thrive professionally. Misty Gibbs examines the differences between being an entrepreneur and a business owner, sharing with The NextWomen the reasons why it is crucial to know which category you fit into, and how this can help your business.

Problems often provide a chance to improve your business. Bev James shares with The NextWomen her tip for how to respond to problems in business when they arise by remembering the 6 Rs – Recognise, Rationalise, Read, Review, Retest and Re-invent – explaining how this method can help solve issues and enable success.

Georgina-Kate Adams, Founder of The Seed, Africa,with a girl whose education was funded through the project. Megan Foo of The NextWomen examines the issue of the lack of access to education for girls in developing countries. Megan talks to Georgina-Kate Adams, Founder of crowdfunding project The Seed, Africa, regarding the impact of educating girls through crowdfunding.